Examining the Role of Frontal and Posterior Oscillatory Electroencephalography Activity in Distractor Suppression

ResearchSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Corballis, PM en
dc.contributor.author Pavlovich, Kane en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-24T02:17:54Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/48632 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Our visual environment is filled with more input than our cognitive system can process at any point in our day. Because of these cognitive limitations on visual processing, researchers have sought to understand how we learn to attend to important aspects of our environment, while filtering out information that is not specific to our goals. The electroencephalogram (EEG) allows us to analyse how different correlates of brain activity respond to these limitations on attention. The mid-frontal theta band (MFT) (4hz-7hz) is one of these correlates, it is measured from frontal central electrode sites and has been implicated in the allocation of cognitive control. The Posterior Alpha (PA) band (8hz-14hz) is found in posterior-occipital sites and is thought to be involved in the suppression of goal irrelevant information. Conversely, the posterior lower beta band (PB) (15hz-20hz) measured at the same sites as PA, is thought to be involved in the active engagement of attentional mechanisms. The current study looked at developing the understanding of these bands by examining the role they played in distractor suppression. High-density EEG was used to measure the timing and power of these bands while participants under took a visual search task. In this task they responded to the orientation of a target letter, while ignoring a distractor of varying predictability. Our data showed that mid-frontal theta bands and PB bands provided more power when a distractor was novel compared to when a distractor was predictable. However, our findings on PA remained inconclusive. A complementary source analysis also revealed a strong link to MFT being generated in the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex, as well as providing functional links to PB and PA enacting on early posterior and visual cortices. Our study provided support for the notion that mid-frontal theta allocates cognitive control, and PB increases available attentive processes during distractor suppression. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoAFull Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Examining the Role of Frontal and Posterior Oscillatory Electroencephalography Activity in Distractor Suppression en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 784536 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-10-24 en


Full text options

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Advanced Search

Browse