Behaviour regulation in Chinese preschool children: Gender and cultural comparisons and relationships with parenting practices

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dc.contributor.advisor Keown, L en
dc.contributor.author Wei, Xingyu en
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-10T20:54:17Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/49321 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract This thesis investigated gender differences in behavioural regulation in 4-year-old Chinese immigrant children (N = 53) and New Zealand European children (N= 50) living in Auckland. This study also examined relationships between maternal and paternal parenting practices and child behavioural regulation and behaviour problems in the Chinese immigrant sample. Children's individual behavioural regulation was measured with two executive function assessments: the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task (HTKS), which is a composite measure of executive function, and the Dimensional Change Card Sort task (DCCS),which measures cognitive flexibility and attention. Teacher reported classroom behavioural regulation data was collected with the Child Behaviour Rating Scale (CBRS). Both fathers and mothers in the Chinese immigrant sample completed questionnaires on parenting styles and practices using the 26-item version of the Parenting Styles and Dimensions Questionnaire (PSDQ) and parenting practices scales (Wu et al., 2002). Each parent also provided ratings of their child's behaviours on the Child Adjustment and Parent Efficacy Scale (CAPES; Morawska et al., 2014). In the Chinese immigrant sample, girls out performed boys on classroom behavioural regulation, while there were no gender differences in individual behavioural regulation. In the New Zealand European sample, girls scored higher than boys on individual behavioural regulation when measured with the DCCS, but no gender differences were found in classroom behavioural regulation or individual behavioural regulation when measured with the HTKS. Chinese immigrant children obtained significantly higher scores on the HTKS than New Zealand European children. Results of correlational analyses in the Chinese immigrant sample showed that maternal and paternal authoritarian parenting were associated with child behaviour problems. There were no significant relationships between parenting styles and practices and child behavioural regulation. Overall, the results provide new information about the gender patterns in classroom and individual behavioural regulation for 4-year-old Chinese immigrant and New Zealand European children. The study identified future research directions for investigating relationships between parenting variables and child behavioural regulation and behaviour problems in Chinese immigrant preschool children. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265196814102091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Behaviour regulation in Chinese preschool children: Gender and cultural comparisons and relationships with parenting practices en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 788919 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-12-11 en


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/

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