Do maternal dietary vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure affect the vitamin D status of exclusively breastfed infants?

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dc.contributor.author Lovell, Amy en
dc.contributor.author Cameron Charles Grant en
dc.contributor.author Clare Rosemary Wall en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-02-11T23:28:48Z en
dc.date.issued 2016-11 en
dc.identifier.issn 1446-6368 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/49940 en
dc.description.abstract AIM: Exclusively breastfed infants are dependent upon their mothers for their vitamin D intake. In New Zealand (NZ), vitamin D supplementation is not routinely recommended for exclusively breastfed infants. We aimed to determine the association of exogenous maternal vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure with serum 25â hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration in exclusively breastfed infants aged 2â 3 months. METHODS: We enrolled a convenience sample of women and their exclusively breastfed infants. Maternal dietary and supplemental vitamin D intake was determined from an interviewerâ administered semiâ quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Sunlight exposure was determined from reported time spent outdoors. Associations of vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure with infant serum 25(OH)D concentration at age 2â 3 months were determined using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS: Sixtyâ three motherâ infant pairs, 73% of whom were European, and their exclusively breastfed infants completed the study. Mean (SD) serum 25(OH)D concentration was 52â nmol/L (30), with 28% of infants being vitamin D deficient (25(OH)D < 50â nmol/L). Estimated median maternal dietary vitamin D intake from food was 158â IU/day. Thirty (48%) mothers consumed vitamin D supplements. Nonâ European ethnicity (P = 0.01) and measurement of 25(OH)D during winter (P < 0.001) were independently associated with infant serum 25(OH)D concentration. Maternal dietary vitamin D intake (P = 0.62), supplement use (P = 0.32) and sunlight exposure (P = 0.72) were not independently associated with infant serum 25(OH)D concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Serum 25(OH)D concentrations in exclusively breastfed infants in NZ are independent of current maternal vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure practices. Consideration needs to be given for vitamin D supplementation of exclusively breastfed infants during winter. en
dc.format.medium Undetermined en
dc.language eng en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Nutrition & dietetics. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Do maternal dietary vitamin D intake and sunlight exposure affect the vitamin D status of exclusively breastfed infants? en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/1747-0080.12254 en
pubs.issue 5 en
pubs.begin-page 420 en
pubs.volume 73 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.end-page 426 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Journal Article en
pubs.elements-id 524371 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Medical Sciences en
pubs.org-id Nutrition en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Paediatrics Child & Youth Hlth en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2018-01-03 en


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