Should health professionals participate in civil disobedience in response to the climate change health emergency?

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dc.contributor.author Bennett, H en
dc.contributor.author Macmillan, A en
dc.contributor.author Jones, Rhys en
dc.contributor.author Blaiklock, A en
dc.contributor.author McMillan, J en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-08T02:33:27Z en
dc.date.issued 2020-01-25 en
dc.identifier.issn 0140-6736 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/50272 en
dc.description.abstract Climate change is a global health emergency and a growing ethical crisis,¹·² and well planned climate action brings opportunities to improve health, equity, and human rights³·⁴·⁵·⁶·⁷. In the face of continued inaction, citizens are turning to civil disobedience to persuade governments to act more urgently⁸. Civil disobedience is public, non-violent action in breach of the law, which is aimed at changing the law or policies of the government. Such action is an act of conscience, and participants accept possible punishment. Health professionals are beginning to advocate for⁹ and participate in these actions¹⁰·¹¹. Several movements for social change have taken civil disobedience action¹²·¹³, but participation by health workers in their professional capacity could involve risks, and relatively little has been written to assist decision making about whether to participate. In this Viewpoint, we apply a framework to guide decision making by considering whether climate change justifies civil disobedience by health professionals as part of our duty of care. The framework comes from a western ethics paradigm, and we acknowledge that many people who relate to this paradigm are relatively protected from early climate–health effects. This protection is not the case for many other people, especially those in climate-vulnerable countries and Indigenous communities. Nonetheless, the framework includes principles that are common currency for health professionals. This article is available free of charge. en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Lancet en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Should health professionals participate in civil disobedience in response to the climate change health emergency? en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/S0140-6736(19)32985-X en
pubs.issue 10220 en
pubs.begin-page 304 en
pubs.volume 395 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.end-page 308 en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 793290 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Te Kupenga Hauora Maori en
pubs.org-id TKHM Teaching en
dc.identifier.eissn 0140-6736 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2020-01-30 en
pubs.online-publication-date 2019-12-07 en
pubs.dimensions-id 31818491 en


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