Infants’ joint attention abilities foster social connections with cooperative partners, but interfere with cooperative ability.

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dc.contributor.author McRae, C en
dc.contributor.author Breeland, Nichole en
dc.contributor.author Meinhardt, Inge en
dc.contributor.author Graham, Beth en
dc.contributor.author Henderson, Annette en
dc.coverage.spatial Louisville, Kentucky, USA en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-15T02:22:31Z en
dc.date.issued 2019-10-19 en
dc.identifier.citation Cognitive Development Society. 19 Oct 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/50391 en
dc.description.abstract Initiating joint attention (IJA) is key for cooperative success. However, daily cooperative competence requires more than simply achieving a shared goal; the social context has a heavy influence. Thus, examining how individuals cooperate and the factors that contribute to a successful cooperative social context is essential to understanding human cooperation. The present study examined if infants' (Mage= 14.30, SD= 0.63, N= 210) IJA (in a non-cooperative task) relates to cooperative success and the social context (affiliative and antagonistic behaviours) during cooperative tasks with an adult. Contrary to past research, IJA was not related to cooperative success. However, IJA was positively related to infants’ affiliative (rs(106) = .23, p = .018) and antagonistic behaviour (rs(100) = .23, p = .019) during cooperation. Infants who demonstrated more IJA in a non-cooperative task were more likely to produce affiliative and antagonistic behaviours in cooperative tasks. Surprisingly, negative relationships were found between cooperative success and affiliative (rs(166) = -.16, p = .044) and antagonistic (rs(166) = -.24, p = .002) behaviours, suggesting that infants successful at attaining shared goals were less likely to show affiliative and antagonistic behaviours while doing so. Our findings suggest that infants' IJA shapes the social context of cooperation and that affiliative and antagonistic behaviours may interfere with infants' cooperative success. en
dc.description.uri https://cogdevsoc.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/AbstractBook.pdf en
dc.relation.ispartof Cognitive Development Society en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Infants’ joint attention abilities foster social connections with cooperative partners, but interfere with cooperative ability. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Infants’ joint attention abilities foster social connections with cooperative partners, but interfere with cooperative ability. en
dc.type Conference Poster en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The authors en
pubs.author-url https://osf.io/wnqsc/ en
pubs.publication-status Published online en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.elements-id 794545 en
pubs.org-id Science en
pubs.org-id Psychology en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2020-02-17 en


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