Collective subjects

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dc.contributor.author Jones, Campbell en
dc.contributor.editor Stavrakakis, Y en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-04-21T22:50:22Z en
dc.date.issued 2020 en
dc.identifier.isbn 1315524775 en
dc.identifier.isbn 9781315524771 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/50455 en
dc.description.abstract If psychoanalysis ever starts out with an individual, it soon becomes clear that each individual human being is filled with swarms of others. Psychoanalytic political theory has therefore developed a theory of the subject with which it is possible to comprehend the often-unrealized capacities for agency and politics that arise from participation in collective subjects, such as groups, crowds, organizations, and assemblies. This chapter explains the place and importance of collective subjects in psychoanalytic political theory, focusing in particular on the theory of the subject in the thought of Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, and Alain Badiou. Beyond this, the chapter seeks to clarify the reality and politics of collective subjects in capitalism. Capitalism destroys previous forms of sociality and produces new forms of collective action. By dint of the productivity of collective action, capital creates collective subjects, while through law and ideology, it produces individuals as owners who parasite on the productivity of collective subjects. The theory of the subject advanced here stresses, however, that subjects are always multiple. Capital is not the only subject or locus of change, and neither do the others of capital automatically have the capacity for social transformation. Social change only ever arises out of the conflict between multiple subjects, and subjects must always be actively constructed and formed, out of but always in excess of the concrete situations with which they are confronted. en
dc.description.uri https://catalogue.library.auckland.ac.nz/permalink/f/t37c0t/uoa_alma51317575980002091 en
dc.publisher Routledge en
dc.relation.ispartof Routledge Handbook of Psychoanalytic Political Theory en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Collective subjects en
dc.type Book Item en
dc.identifier.doi 10.4324/9781315524771-19 en
pubs.begin-page 233 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=YHatDwAAQBAJ en
pubs.end-page 247 en
pubs.place-of-publication Oxford, UK en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.elements-id 793781 en
pubs.org-id Arts en
pubs.org-id Social Sciences en
pubs.org-id Sociology en
pubs.number 18 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2020-02-10 en


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