Smiling and use of first-name by a healthcare receptionist robot: Effects on user perceptions, attitudes, and behaviours

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dc.contributor.author Johanson, DL en
dc.contributor.author Ahn, HS en
dc.contributor.author Sutherland, Craig en
dc.contributor.author Brown, B en
dc.contributor.author MacDonald, Bruce en
dc.contributor.author Lim, JY en
dc.contributor.author Ahn, BK en
dc.contributor.author Broadbent, Elizabeth en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-14T22:04:44Z en
dc.date.issued 2020-01-01 en
dc.identifier.citation Paladyn 11(1):40-51 01 Jan 2020 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/51533 en
dc.description.abstract © 2020 Deborah L. Johanson et al., published by De Gruyter. Robots are now starting to be developed and used as receptionists in health applications. In this regard, it is important that robots' behavioural skills are developed and researched so that people have appropriate and comfortable interactions. Smiling and use of first name are two more important social communication skills used during human interactions. While smiling and use of first name are often employed by robots in human interactions, the effect of these behaviours on perceptions of receptionist robots has not yet been experimentally investigated. This study explored the effects of robot smiling and robot use of the participant's first name on perceptions of robot friendliness, mind, and personality, as well as attitudes and smiling behaviour. Forty participants interacted with a medical receptionist robot four times, in a two by two repeated measures design. Both smiling and use of first name had significant positive effects on participants' perceptions of robot personality. Robot smiling also showed significant effects on participants' overall attitudes towards robots, ratings of robot friendliness, and perceptions of the robot's mind, and increased the frequency of participants' own smiling. There were no significant interaction effects. Robot smiling in particular can enhance user perceptions of robots and increase reciprocal smiling. en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Paladyn en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.title Smiling and use of first-name by a healthcare receptionist robot: Effects on user perceptions, attitudes, and behaviours en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1515/pjbr-2020-0008 en
pubs.issue 1 en
pubs.begin-page 40 en
pubs.volume 11 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The authors en
pubs.end-page 51 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Journal Article en
pubs.elements-id 797175 en
pubs.org-id Engineering en
pubs.org-id Department of Electrical, Computer and Software Engineering en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Psychological Medicine Dept en
dc.identifier.eissn 2081-4836 en


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https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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