Culture, meat and climate change: The role of culture in dietary practices and how this affects the meat and dairy consumption of individuals in response to climate change

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Parsons, M en
dc.contributor.author Hayes, Jodie en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-16T22:01:42Z en
dc.date.issued 2019 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/52466 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Animal agriculture is responsible for 14–20% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which contribute to the global problem of climate change (Graham & Abrahamse, 2016; Hansan, 2018; Macdiarmid et al., 2016; Peace, 2008; Seves et al., 2016; Stoll-Kleemann & Schmidt, 2016). The personal reduction of meat and dairy consumption has been suggested as a way for individuals to lower their GHG emissions, thus helping to mitigate the effects of climate change. So far, implementation of this mitigation strategy has proven unsuccessful, due to an unwillingness to reduce personal consumption. This research considers the role of culture on individuals’ dietary practices, to understand how this might affect their willingness to reduce their meat and/or dairy consumption as a climate change mitigation strategy. A web-based questionnaire was used to determine how culture affected the dietary practices of New Zealanders, and their perception of changing these practices in the face of climate change. Following this, 10 semi-structured interviews were used to explore the interactions between culture and diet. The theory of planned behaviour was used to unpack the values and beliefs held by different cultural groups to consider the beliefs that facilitated and discouraged dietary changes. This research concluded that meat and dairy are an entrenched norm in many food cultures, including New Zealand’s. Although participants expressed an interest in reducing their consumption of animal products, the presence of barriers, most notably social norms, prevented most people from doing so. This research also found that ethical considerations were the strongest motivators for dietary change. Going forward, this research could be used to inform interventions that target a particular cultural group to more effectively motivate a personal reduction of meat and/or dairy products. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265326712702091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Culture, meat and climate change: The role of culture in dietary practices and how this affects the meat and dairy consumption of individuals in response to climate change en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Environmental Management en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 805741 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2020-07-17 en


Files in this item

Find Full text

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Browse

Statistics