Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisations among young children: a data linkage study.

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dc.contributor.author Prasad, Namrata en
dc.contributor.author Newbern, E Claire en
dc.contributor.author Trenholme, Adrian en
dc.contributor.author Wood, Tim en
dc.contributor.author Thompson, Mark G en
dc.contributor.author Aminisani, Nayyereh en
dc.contributor.author Huang, Q Sue en
dc.contributor.author Grant, Cameron en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-17T01:14:51Z en
dc.date.issued 2019-01 en
dc.identifier.citation Epidemiology and infection 147:e246 Jan 2019 en
dc.identifier.issn 0950-2688 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/52577 en
dc.description.abstract We aimed to provide comprehensive estimates of laboratory-confirmed respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated hospitalisations. Between 2012 and 2015, active surveillance of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalisations during winter seasons was used to estimate the seasonal incidence of laboratory-confirmed RSV hospitalisations in children aged <5 years in Auckland, New Zealand (NZ). Incidence rates were estimated by fine age group, ethnicity and socio-economic status (SES) strata. Additionally, RSV disease estimates determined through active surveillance were compared to rates estimated from hospital discharge codes. There were 5309 ARI hospitalisations among children during the study period, of which 3923 (73.9%) were tested for RSV and 1597 (40.7%) were RSV-positive. The seasonal incidence of RSV-associated ARI hospitalisations, once corrected for non-testing, was 6.1 (95% confidence intervals 5.8-6.4) per 1000 children <5 years old. The highest incidence was among children aged <3 months. Being of indigenous Māori or Pacific ethnicity or living in a neighbourhood with low SES independently increased the risk of an RSV-associated hospitalisation. RSV hospital discharge codes had a sensitivity of 71% for identifying laboratory-confirmed RSV cases. RSV infection is a leading cause of hospitalisation among children in NZ, with significant disparities by ethnicity and SES. Our findings highlight the need for effective RSV vaccines and therapies. en
dc.format.medium Print en
dc.language eng en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Epidemiology and infection en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.title Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisations among young children: a data linkage study. en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1017/S0950268819001377 en
pubs.begin-page e246 en
pubs.volume 147 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The authors en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype research-article en
pubs.subtype Journal Article en
pubs.elements-id 778518 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id School of Medicine en
pubs.org-id Paediatrics Child & Youth Hlth en
dc.identifier.eissn 1469-4409 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2019-08-01 en
pubs.dimensions-id 31364578 en


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