Cocaring Relationships Between Chinese Immigrant Parents of Infants and Toddlers and Their Teachers

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dc.contributor.advisor Keown, L en
dc.contributor.author Huang, Jiahui en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-19T02:02:16Z en
dc.date.issued 2020 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/52705 en
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract This study examined the cocaring relationships of New Zealand Chinese immigrant parent of infants and toddlers and their early childhood teachers. The study drew on Feinberg’s co-parenting framework and the cocaring dimensions of supportiveness vs undermining, childrearing agreement vs disagreement, and open communication involving parents and teachers, identified by Lang et al. (2016). The research also explored the possible influence of Chinese parenting beliefs on the nature of cocaring parent/teacher relationships. The sample consisted of 11 teachers and 9 Chinese parents of a child between the age of 13 months to 35 months from 6 early childhood centres in Auckland. An individual, semistructured interview was conducted with each teacher and parents. Interviews were coded using a general inductive approach guided by the cocaring framework from Lang et al. (2016). The study found support for the dimensions of supportiveness vs undermining, and childrearing agreement vs disagreement, although the negative aspects of these dimensions were less evident than the positive aspects. In particular, there was evidence for a high level of supportiveness and childrearing agreement, which seemed to be key to a positive cocaring relationship. Communication was found to play an important role in the quality of cocaring relationships. Some possible Chinese cultural influences on parents’ childrearing beliefs were identified that may have affected aspects of cocaring parent/teacher relationships. These included a belief in children learning self-control from an early age and a desire to maintain harmonious relationships. The study also found differences between parents and teachers about the role of the teacher in providing education and support to parents. Chinese parents believed that the role of teachers was to provide educational support to their children for learning and development, rather than to support parents. The majority of teacher responses were about providing parents with emotional support and respecting parents as experts about their children. This was the first study to investigate the cocaring relationships between Chinese immigrant parents and their teachers of infants and toddlers in New Zealand early childhood education centres. Findings add to the emerging field of international research on cocaring relationships between teachers and parents of infants and toddlers. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/ en
dc.title Cocaring Relationships Between Chinese Immigrant Parents of Infants and Toddlers and Their Teachers en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.elements-id 810557 en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2020-08-19 en


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