Exploring factors affecting academics' adoption of emerging mobile technologies-an extended UTAUT perspective

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dc.contributor.author Hu Sailong en
dc.contributor.author Laxman Kumar en
dc.contributor.author Lee Kerry en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-10-16T03:47:01Z
dc.date.available 2020-10-16T03:47:01Z
dc.date.issued 2020-4-26 en
dc.identifier.issn 1360-2357 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/53352
dc.description.abstract © 2020, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. With the proliferation of technology and the Internet, the way education is delivered has undergone a rapid change in different educational settings. Whilst a large amount of research has investigated the implementation of mobile technologies in education, there is still a paucity of research from a teaching perspective across disciplines within higher education. For this reason, this study investigated the acceptance, preparedness and adoption of mobile technologies by academic faculties within higher education, using the context of China. Underpinned by the extended Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) Model, a large-scale quantitative survey investigated the factors affecting academics’ behavioural intentions and use for mobile technologies, and variations between different demographic groups. Findings suggested that the most significant factors affecting academics’ behavioural intention and behaviours of use were their performance expectancy, facilitating conditions, hedonic motivation and habit. Behavioural intention also affected how the faculty staff used their mobile technologies. Moreover, gender, age, teaching experience and discipline were found to be moderating factors. This research provides further verification of the effectiveness of the UTAUT2 Model in the higher education context and the field of new technologies implementation. Findings from this study provide beneficial insights for universities, faculties, and academics in policymaking, faculty management, professional development and lecturer instruction concerning mobile technologies. en
dc.language English en
dc.publisher SPRINGER en
dc.relation.ispartofseries EDUCATION AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.subject Social Sciences en
dc.subject Education & Educational Research en
dc.subject Academics en
dc.subject Adoption en
dc.subject Mobile technologies en
dc.subject Extended UTAUT model en
dc.subject PRESERVICE TEACHERS ACCEPTANCE en
dc.subject UNIFIED THEORY en
dc.subject INFORMATION-TECHNOLOGY en
dc.subject LEARNING ACCEPTANCE en
dc.subject HIGHER-EDUCATION en
dc.subject USER ACCEPTANCE en
dc.subject SYSTEMS en
dc.subject DETERMINANTS en
dc.subject PERCEPTIONS en
dc.subject SIMULATION en
dc.subject 13 Education en
dc.subject 08 Information And Computing Sciences en
dc.title Exploring factors affecting academics' adoption of emerging mobile technologies-an extended UTAUT perspective en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s10639-020-10171-x en
dc.date.updated 2020-09-07T18:42:42Z en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000528671600001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e41486220adb198d0efde5a3b153e7d en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.subtype Early Access en
pubs.subtype Journal en
pubs.elements-id 792861 en
dc.identifier.eissn 1573-7608 en
pubs.online-publication-date 2020-4-26 en


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