Leadership task effectiveness and student achievement: Perceptions of principals, deputy principals and lead teachers

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dc.contributor.advisor Meyer, Frauke
dc.contributor.advisor Le Fevre, Deidre
dc.contributor.advisor Alansari, Mohamed
dc.contributor.author Fikuree, Waseema
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-12T20:48:01Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-12T20:48:01Z
dc.date.issued 2020 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/53591
dc.description.abstract Educational leadership and its relation to student academic achievement is a well-researched area; however, little is known about principals’ effectiveness in specific leadership tasks and its relation with student achievement. The purpose of this study was to explore task effectiveness, as perceived by principals themselves, their deputy principals and lead teachers in the context of the Maldives. More specifically this study identified specific dimensions of principal tasks and investigated the relations between these dimensions and student achievement in lower secondary schools in the Maldives. This study employed a quantitative design using surveys to collect self- and other ratings of principal task effectiveness. Principals, deputy principals and lead teachers were asked to complete the same survey regarding principal task effectiveness, thus triangulating principal self-ratings with ratings from the other senior management team members. All of the 177 public secondary schools offering the International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) in the Maldives responded to the survey and their students’ grades in IGCSE mathematics and English as a second language were provided by the Ministry of Education. An exploratory factor analysis was used to identify dimensions of principal task effectiveness. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to examine the relation between perceived principal task effectiveness, principal characteristics and student achievement. The analyses revealed five principal task dimensions: School Management, Instructional Management, Teacher Quality, External Relations, and Programme Development and Evaluation. The Teacher Quality dimension and principals’ experience at their current school positively predicted student achievement in the IGCSE English as a Second Language examination. Further, principals with master’s degree qualifications perceived themselves as being more effective than those with bachelor’s and doctoral degrees. This study provides a comprehensive picture of principal task effectiveness in the Maldives, highlighting specific strengths and areas for improvement. The findings provide implications for policy makers for principal training, ongoing professional learning and the daily work of principals. The study provides a comprehensive framework of leadership task effectiveness which leaders and policy makers can utilise to examine leadership in schools and identify professional learning needs. It also highlights the importance of focusing on principal task effectiveness and its link to student outcomes.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265307813502091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/
dc.title Leadership task effectiveness and student achievement: Perceptions of principals, deputy principals and lead teachers
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.date.updated 2020-10-24T22:41:21Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en


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