Communicating complex ocean issues: How strategically framed messages affect awareness and motivation when conveyed using narrative vs. expository language

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Kolandai‐Matchett, Komathi
dc.contributor.author Armoudian, Maria
dc.contributor.author Li, Eileen
dc.date.accessioned 2021-01-15T01:18:17Z
dc.date.available 2021-01-15T01:18:17Z
dc.date.issued 2020-11-10
dc.identifier.issn 1052-7613
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/54273
dc.description.abstract © 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Considering the nascent stage of marine conservation communication, little is understood about how best to communicate complex issues, such as ocean acidification (OA), that are remote and invisible. Despite accumulating evidence of OA’s adverse effects on marine ecosystems and biota and subsequent consequences for human societies, it remains obscure to a majority of the public. This study compared two language styles (narrative and expository) to determine which was more effective for communicating OA to diverse audiences. The two language styles were scripted and presented in YouTube videos, with identical visuals, message contents and message frames identified as potentially effective for environmental and marine conservation communication. In an online experiment, 183 respondents were randomly assigned to view one of three videos (narrative, expository, control). Although the literature suggested the value of narrative-based conservation communication, findings suggest that expository language was comparably effective for increasing awareness and motivation. Nevertheless, there were some indications that story-like narratives may better enhance motivation. This study also strengthens the argument for careful selection of frames to enhance the effectiveness of marine conservation communication.
dc.language en
dc.publisher Wiley
dc.relation.ispartofseries Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject Science & Technology
dc.subject Life Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject Physical Sciences
dc.subject Environmental Sciences
dc.subject Marine & Freshwater Biology
dc.subject Water Resources
dc.subject Environmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subject environmental communication
dc.subject expository language
dc.subject frames
dc.subject framing
dc.subject marine conservation communication
dc.subject narrative language
dc.subject ocean acidification
dc.subject science communication
dc.subject CLIMATE-CHANGE
dc.subject ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION
dc.subject PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS
dc.subject ECOSYSTEM SERVICES
dc.subject COLLECTIVE ACTION
dc.subject ACIDIFICATION
dc.subject KNOWLEDGE
dc.subject SCIENCE
dc.subject ATTITUDES
dc.subject BEHAVIOR
dc.subject 05 Environmental Sciences
dc.subject 06 Biological Sciences
dc.subject 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
dc.title Communicating complex ocean issues: How strategically framed messages affect awareness and motivation when conveyed using narrative vs. expository language
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/aqc.3484
dc.date.updated 2020-12-08T22:19:53Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000587990700001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e41486220adb198d0efde5a3b153e7d
pubs.publication-status Published online
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article
pubs.subtype Early Access
pubs.subtype Journal
pubs.elements-id 825803
dc.identifier.eissn 1099-0755
pubs.number aqc.3484
pubs.online-publication-date 2020-11-10


Files in this item

Find Full text

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Browse

Statistics