Public perceptions of mammalian pests, pest management and monitoring of ground-dwelling animals on Kawau Island, New Zealand

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dc.contributor.advisor Warman, Guy
dc.contributor.advisor Schwendenmann, Luitgard
dc.contributor.advisor Pawley, Matthew
dc.contributor.advisor Cheeseman, James
dc.contributor.author Kim, James
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-16T01:33:54Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-16T01:33:54Z
dc.date.issued 2020 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/54468
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Mammalian pest species pose a significant global threat to native fauna and flora, particularly to island ecosystems. The eradication of pest animals on offshore islands has been critical in protecting threatened species. Increasingly, pest eradication efforts have been steadily directed towards permanently inhabited islands. This situation presents added challenges of social complexity and divided land ownership to an inherently difficult management task. In 2019, the residential island of Kawau was selected by the regional government as a key candidate for multi-species pest eradication of rats, brushtail possums, stoats, and wallabies. This thesis investigated social and ecological aspects regarding pest management on inhabited islands. A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess residents’ (n = 43) and visitors’ (n = 84) perceptions of pests and pest management on Kawau Island. Nearly all pest animals were perceived to be highly damaging to native wildlife or native bush. However, wallabies were perceived to be the least favourable animal for control or eradication (Tukey HSD test; p < 0.001). While respondents were overall in favour of managing pests, this study identified that eradicating wallabies would likely be a source of social conflict. Using wildlife camera traps, I monitored the terrestrial animal community between two areas with opposite pest management regimes on Kawau Island. Furthermore, I investigated the population-level timing of activity for one pest genus: wallabies. I identified that in the area with selective wallaby control, there was over a 10 and 100-fold increase in possum and rat occurrences and a decrease in native bird occurrences. Observed diurnal activity within forests suggested habitat-dependent differences in the timing of wallaby activity. This thesis achieved its overarching aim in providing a scientific basis for future management actions and further research. Considering that the proposed pest eradication program on Kawau Island is still in its’ early stages, further public consultations, feasibility assessments, and monitoring studies were identified as important subsequent steps.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99265333491002091 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/
dc.title Public perceptions of mammalian pests, pest management and monitoring of ground-dwelling animals on Kawau Island, New Zealand
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Environmental Science
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.date.updated 2021-02-01T07:07:57Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: the author en


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