A Path Drawn Out: Understanding Tertiary Science Participation in Aotearoa New Zealand

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dc.contributor.advisor Locke, Kirsten Anna
dc.contributor.advisor O'Neale, Dion
dc.contributor.author Turnbull, Steven Martin
dc.date.accessioned 2021-03-09T19:22:45Z
dc.date.available 2021-03-09T19:22:45Z
dc.date.issued 2020 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/54611
dc.description.abstract Understanding who chooses to progress in science education is an important issue across the world. Not only are governments motivated to boost the number of skilled workers in STEM domains, but efforts are also being made to ensure that science is viewed as a viable pathway for all students, regardless of their gender, ethnicity, or social class. Despite these efforts, inequities continue to persist in Aotearoa New Zealand, and little research has explored what progression through science education looks like. The following work seeks to fill this gap by interrogating a range of data sources regarding students’ experiences in tertiary science education through a theoretical framework based on the work of Pierre Bourdieu. Beginning with quantitative analysis of large-scale administrative student records, I provide a surface-level summary of What science participation looks like in Aotearoa New Zealand. I then introduce the utility of Bourdieu’s sociological theory in explaining Why we see disparities in science education. Through analysis of a questionnaire administered to science students at the University of Auckland, I discuss the influence of social class on science participation, using factors related to Bourdieu’s theory that not readily available in administrative data (such as science-related cultural and social capital). Following this, I build a new theoretical model, informed by qualitative analysis of interview data, to delve even deeper into the experiences of university students studying science. Through this final theoretical model, I explore students’ lived experiences in the field of science education, and provide a discussion of How we can make the field of science education more equitable. By adopting a truly mixed-methods approach to understanding participation in science education, my thesis offers a comprehensive, transdisciplinary exploration of tertiary science education in Aotearoa New Zealand. Through this approach, I show how progression in science may be a path drawn out for some students, but not all.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/
dc.title A Path Drawn Out: Understanding Tertiary Science Participation in Aotearoa New Zealand
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.date.updated 2021-03-01T06:40:15Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en


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