An evaluation of stakeholder needs for gambling E-mental health services in Aotearoa New Zealand

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dc.contributor.advisor Rodda, Simone
dc.contributor.author Aucamp, Anna Louisa
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-25T03:26:57Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-25T03:26:57Z
dc.date.issued 2021 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/55146
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Background: Gambling-related harm is a major public health issue in Aotearoa, New Zealand but expert treatment services are under-subscribed. E-mental health could be a way to expand the stepped care model and increase access to services and expert clinicians. A blended approach that involves e-mental health and expert support could also be a way of increasing client engagement and retention. This thesis sought to determine the needs and preferences for gambling specific e-mental health in New Zealand with a focus on self-help screening and internet delivered CBT (i-CBT). Methods: A series of iterative and interconnected activities were undertaken. A needs analysis was conducted with 47 gambling providers and consumers in New Zealand. The needs analysis delivered a survey via Qualtrics to understand service provider and consumer experiences and preferences towards e-mental health and preferences for the configuration of two e-mental health tools. The second activity involved a co-design Hui that brought together gambling experts from across New Zealand to finalise the configuration of the two new e-mental health tools. Thematic analysis was used to code extensive notes taken during the co-design Hui. Results: The needs analysis found high agreement that e-mental health tools were helpful, valuable and relatively easy to use. The main benefits were increased access and reduced barriers to treatment. The main disadvantages were perceived loss of face-to-face time/resources. In terms of the self-help screener, participants reported a preference for it to be around 10 minutes in duration with support delivered by email, chat, and phone or face-to-face. Implementation issues included technical and clinical training, mentoring and supervision as well as cultural competence. In terms of a blended approach for i-CBT, participants reported it was feasible and the preferred duration of i-CBT was around 30 minutes per week. Findings from the co-design Hui suggested most support for a partial blend whereby clinicians and counsellors selected intervention content at each episode of care. Conclusions: Gambling treatment services in New Zealand are ready and willing to introduce a blended model into face-to-face services. This study found support for both a self-help screening tool and blended i-CBT as part of treatment as usual. The findings from this study will inform a new co-designed e-mental health programme for gambling harm reduction.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/
dc.title An evaluation of stakeholder needs for gambling E-mental health services in Aotearoa New Zealand
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Health Science
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.date.updated 2021-05-15T02:39:58Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: the author en


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