Yoshioka Yayoi’s Womanhood: Women, Health, and the State in Pre-war Japan

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dc.contributor.advisor Nakamura, Ellen
dc.contributor.advisor Inouye, Melissa
dc.contributor.author Hou, Haiying
dc.date.accessioned 2021-09-03T00:26:26Z
dc.date.available 2021-09-03T00:26:26Z
dc.date.issued 2021 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/56363
dc.description.abstract This study examines the writings of Yoshioka Yayoi (1871-1959) on the relationship between women, health, and the state in the first half of the 20th century. Yoshioka was a doctor and founder of the first Japanese women’s medical school, Tokyo Women’s Medical University today. She was also a women’s rights activist and held key positions in various government groups during World War II. Yoshioka was purged from both public office and the education sector from 1947 to 1951 as a result of her enthusiastic support for the war, under the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP). Scholars have paid attention to Yoshioka’s wartime role and educational contribution. This thesis explores an overlooked field of Yoshioka’s connection to women’s everyday lives, especially her communication with a mass audience through popular magazines. It will particularly focus on Yoshioka’s insightful advice as an obstetrician-gynaecologist on women’s sexual health, birth control, and mothers’ health. Her views are also important because health matters were linked to policies designed to build national strength. Thus, women were connected with the state through their role as agents in implementing health policies. After 1868, the government sought to develop the state by controlling women’s bodies, aiming to incorporate their health as part of efforts to achieve economic and political goals. However, this thesis also pays close attention to how Yoshioka embraced the positive influence of state regulation of women’s health and tried to further women’s interests. It will also offer an in-depth examination of how women increased their empowerment and agency under the influence of state health policies, rather than being confined by them. Analysing the topic of women’s health sheds light on not only the path of women’s self-development but also the complex and dynamic relationship between women and the state.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/
dc.title Yoshioka Yayoi’s Womanhood: Women, Health, and the State in Pre-war Japan
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Asian Studies
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.date.updated 2021-07-09T01:52:43Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en


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