Sinonasal and gastrointestinal bacterial composition and abundance are stable after 1 week of once-daily oral antibiotic treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis.

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dc.contributor.author Siu, Joey
dc.contributor.author Mackenzie, Brett Wagner
dc.contributor.author Klingler, Lilian
dc.contributor.author Biswas, Kristi
dc.contributor.author Wang, Yi
dc.contributor.author Hung, Cheung-Tak
dc.contributor.author Jeong, Soo Hee
dc.contributor.author Barnett, Daniel
dc.contributor.author Tingle, Malcolm Drummond
dc.contributor.author Douglas, Richard George
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2021-09-09T22:19:51Z
dc.date.available 2021-09-09T22:19:51Z
dc.date.issued 2021-4-20
dc.identifier.issn 2042-6976
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/56484
dc.description.abstract <h4>Background</h4>Despite the widespread prescription of antibiotics for the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), their efficacy remains uncertain. Limited penetration of systemic antibiotics into the sinonasal mucosa has been reported previously by this group. This study aimed to investigate the short-term effects of antibiotics on the sinus and gut microbiota as well as any relationships these had with drug distribution.<h4>Methods</h4>Thirty subjects undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery for CRS were randomized to one of three groups: (1) doxycycline (100 mg daily for 7 days); (2) roxithromycin (300 mg daily for 7 days); and (3) control (no antibiotics given). Sinonasal and stool samples collected before and after treatment were analyzed using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-targeted amplicon sequencing and Droplet Digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacterial community composition and the quantification of bacterial DNA, respectively.<h4>Results</h4>There were no significant major bacterial community shifts or changes to bacterial diversity and load following the treatment period in all patient groups. Non-significant trend reductions were observed in gut microbial diversity with antibiotics. For the roxithromycin group, sinonasal bacterial diversity was negatively correlated with serum drug levels and reduced overall compared to controls (p < 0.05). The relative abundance of Staphylococcus ASV129 in sinonasal samples reduced with increasing mucus doxycycline levels (p = 0.01).<h4>Conclusion</h4>Antibiotic prescription for CRS should be further investigated because of preliminary evidence of poor sinonasal drug penetration, unproven efficacy, and the potential impact of dysbiosis in the sinuses and off-target sites. Further studies should consider distinguishing the presence of DNA from viable and nonviable bacteria.
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Wiley
dc.relation.ispartofseries International forum of allergy & rhinology
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject bacteria
dc.subject gastrointestinal microbiome
dc.subject macrolides
dc.subject microbiota
dc.subject nasal cavity
dc.subject paranasal sinuses
dc.subject sinusitis
dc.subject tetracyclines
dc.subject Science & Technology
dc.subject Life Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject Otorhinolaryngology
dc.subject bacteria
dc.subject gastrointestinal microbiome
dc.subject macrolides
dc.subject microbiota
dc.subject nasal cavity
dc.subject paranasal sinuses
dc.subject sinusitis
dc.subject tetracyclines
dc.subject 1107 Immunology
dc.title Sinonasal and gastrointestinal bacterial composition and abundance are stable after 1 week of once-daily oral antibiotic treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1002/alr.22799
dc.date.updated 2021-08-25T02:52:21Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33877743
pubs.publication-status Published
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Journal Article
pubs.elements-id 849321
dc.identifier.eissn 2042-6984
pubs.number alr.22799
pubs.online-publication-date 2021-4-20


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