Changes in Japanese students’ beliefs about language learning and English language proficiency in a study-abroad context

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dc.contributor.advisor Ellis, Rod en
dc.contributor.author Tanaka, Koichi en
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-11T22:01:06Z en
dc.date.available 2010-03-11T22:01:06Z en
dc.date.issued 2004 en
dc.identifier.citation Thesis (PhD--Applied Language Studies and Linguistics)--University of Auckland, 2004. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/5687 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract The aim of this study is to investigate changes in 56 Japanese students' beliefs about language learning and English language proficiency in a context of study abroad in New Zealand over a period of 12 weeks and the relationship between their beliefs and English proficiency. This study is significant for both practical and theoretical points of view. That is because although an enormous number of Japanese nationals have been studying English at language schools overseas, little empirical research has explored what they actually thought and learned during the study abroad, how their beliefs develop over time, and what relationship there is between their beliefs and learning outcomes. The quantitative and qualitative analyses of the data obtained by multiple sources found two notable tendencies of changes in the Japanese students' beliefs about language learning during study abroad. First, they tended to become more balanced learners. They rediscovered the importance of analytic learning (e.g., learning grammar and vocabulary) in order to improve their communicative competence in English, while they reinforced their beliefs about the importance of experiential learning (e.g., speaking with others in English). Second, they tended to become more realistic learners. They realised that, unlike their initial expectations, living in an English-speaking country does not automatically lead to a miraculous gain in English proficiency in a short period of time. Thus, they understood the importance of their own efforts. A statistically significant gain in the Japanese students' general English proficiency, measured by a standardised test (the Oxford Placement Test), occurred during the study abroad. Also, a statistically significant gain in the Japanese students' oral fluency occurred during the study abroad, but almost no improvement in the grammatical accuracy and sentence complexity of their oral production was found. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a positive shift in the Japanese students' responses to the predetermined belief statements relating to experiential learning could predict an increase in the total test scores to some extent. That is, the Japanese students who reinforced their beliefs about experiential learning during the study abroad tended to advance more in general English proficiency. en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA99144302214002091 en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Changes in Japanese students’ beliefs about language learning and English language proficiency in a study-abroad context en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Applied Language Studies & Linguistics en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en


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