Longitudinal Associations Between Illness Perceptions and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes.

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dc.contributor.author Alyami, Mohsen
dc.contributor.author Serlachius, Anna
dc.contributor.author Mokhtar, Ibrahim
dc.contributor.author Broadbent, Elizabeth
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2021-11-11T04:49:40Z
dc.date.available 2021-11-11T04:49:40Z
dc.date.issued 2021-9-14
dc.identifier.issn 1070-5503
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/57386
dc.description.abstract <h4>Background</h4>Cross-sectional research demonstrates associations between illness perceptions and glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Prospective studies are limited and show mixed findings. This study aimed to investigate (1) whether baseline illness perceptions predicted glycemic control (HbA1c levels) at 6-12-month follow-up and (2) possible differences in baseline illness perceptions between individuals who completed at least one HbA1c blood test during the 12-month follow-up and those who did not.<h4>Methods</h4>A total of 115 individuals with T2D were recruited from an outpatient clinic. Demographic and clinical information and illness perceptions were assessed at baseline. HbA1c was assessed at baseline and 12 months later from clinical records. Hierarchical multiple linear regression examined associations between baseline illness perceptions and HbA1c levels at 6-12-month follow-up, controlling for age, sex, education, types of diabetes medication, and baseline HbA1c.<h4>Results</h4>Univariate analysis showed perceived weight management effectiveness at baseline was associated with lower HbA1c at follow-up (rho = -.25, p = .04, n = 67). Adjusted multiple regression showed that HbA1c at baseline was the only significant predictor of HbA1c at 6-12-month follow-up (β = 0.51, p < .001). There were no significant differences in baseline illness perceptions between individuals who completed HbA1c blood tests during follow-up (n = 78) and those who did not (n = 34), p > .05.<h4>Conclusion</h4>Illness perceptions at baseline did not predict longitudinal HbA1c in adjusted analyses, nor completion of HbA1c tests. Results may be due to temporal variability in HbA1c and barriers to accessing blood tests.
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofseries International journal of behavioral medicine
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject Glycemic control
dc.subject HbA1c
dc.subject Illness perceptions
dc.subject Type 2 diabetes
dc.subject Social Sciences
dc.subject Psychology, Clinical
dc.subject Psychology
dc.subject Glycemic control
dc.subject HbA1c
dc.subject Illness perceptions
dc.subject Type 2 diabetes
dc.subject SELF-CARE BEHAVIORS
dc.subject COMMON-SENSE MODEL
dc.subject PERSONAL MODELS
dc.subject FOLLOW-UP
dc.subject BELIEFS
dc.subject ADULTS
dc.subject COMPLICATIONS
dc.subject METAANALYSIS
dc.subject ATTENDANCE
dc.subject ADHERENCE
dc.subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
dc.subject 1701 Psychology
dc.title Longitudinal Associations Between Illness Perceptions and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s12529-021-10024-y
pubs.begin-page 1
dc.date.updated 2021-10-07T03:58:05Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34523073
pubs.end-page 10
pubs.publication-status Published
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype research-article
pubs.subtype Journal Article
pubs.elements-id 866525
dc.identifier.eissn 1532-7558
dc.identifier.pii 10.1007/s12529-021-10024-y
pubs.online-publication-date 2021-9-14


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