Pesepesega o le mavaega: Singing the farewell in Samoan funerals

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dc.contributor.advisor Fouche, Christa
dc.contributor.advisor Anae, Melani
dc.contributor.author Urale-Baker, Natasha
dc.date.accessioned 2021-11-23T02:26:11Z
dc.date.available 2021-11-23T02:26:11Z
dc.date.issued 2021 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/57518
dc.description.abstract Samoan people have had a death and dying culture from pre-colonisation to the present day, both in Samoa and in their adopted homelands such as Aotearoa, New Zealand. Like all other cultures, song has been part of death rituals in Fa’asamoa (Samoan culture) and this is very much the case in contemporary New Zealand society. Funerals continue to bring Samoan aiga (Samoan families) together to farewell a loved one. Songs are part of this process, not only in the actual funeral service but also prior to it, when the body is lying in state in the family home, and at the after-function post burial. This qualitative research project explored songs in Samoan funerals; how they are selected, and their meaning(s) for participants as part of funeral ritual and Fa’asamoa in New Zealand. The research framework is based on the Kakala: native to Tonga, this is when different natural materials such as flowers and fruits are gathered and woven to make a Kakala (garland) for a specific purpose to present to a particular individual as a sign of love and appreciation. The data collection method is Talanoa, developed from an ancient practice in the Pacific where conversation is based on sacred relationships. There was a total of 29 participants, recruited in consultation with a a Samoan funeral director, who was also a participant. Other participants are members of six Samoan aiga who have lost an elder in the last five years and who represented different generations from each of the six aiga. Three main categories emerged from the data, namely the essence of ‘Fa’asamoa’, the importance of ‘History in Song’ and ‘Connection in Song’. The findings of this research will increase our understanding of Samoan cultural practices in New Zealand.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/
dc.title Pesepesega o le mavaega: Singing the farewell in Samoan funerals
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Social Work
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.date.updated 2021-10-20T07:06:07Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en


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