Research Autonomy and “Marketisation” in Higher Education: A Case Study of Two New Zealand Universities

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dc.contributor.advisor Gunn, Cathy
dc.contributor.advisor Sturm, Sean
dc.contributor.author Sarpong, Joshua
dc.date.accessioned 2022-01-12T00:42:14Z
dc.date.available 2022-01-12T00:42:14Z
dc.date.issued 2021 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/57954
dc.description.abstract Using the Auckland University of Technology and the University of Auckland as a case study, this study seeks to provide a conceptual model for how universities can best maintain their research autonomy in the face of increasing business practices in higher education. One of the core functions of a university is to search for and discover knowledge through research. To be able to do this effectively, the research must be as autonomous as possible because autonomy is regarded as an essential element in the research performance of academics. While empirical evidence about the benefits of research autonomy is mixed, a growing pool of research shows that research autonomy is limited in most universities. Although some scholars attribute this to corporate practices of the higher education system, other scholars believe that the “market” and “market-like” activities can strengthen the autonomy of academics, if it is done cautiously. I draw on resource dependence theory to suggest that, despite pressures from the external stakeholders (notably, government and industry), universities can increase their research autonomy through the implementation of strategic measures. I use a case study design and draw on interviews and document analysis to generate the findings. I interview twenty-six staff in selected faculties and positions at the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology, and analysed documents such as NZ Government’s statement of science investment, and the universities’ strategic plans and research policies. I have found that research autonomy is a relative term, and that university-industry-government research collaboration can enrich universities with resources required to strengthen their research mission. However, if such relationships are not managed well, they can deprive universities of their right to pursue knowledge for its own sake and curtail their role as critic and conscience of society.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/
dc.title Research Autonomy and “Marketisation” in Higher Education: A Case Study of Two New Zealand Universities
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.date.updated 2021-12-28T04:31:36Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en


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