Navigating autonomy, agency, and accountability: A study of school self-evaluation in New Zealand secondary schools

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dc.contributor.advisor Mutch, Carol
dc.contributor.advisor Shah, Ritesh
dc.contributor.author Dyson, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned 2022-02-14T02:37:25Z
dc.date.available 2022-02-14T02:37:25Z
dc.date.issued 2021 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/58159
dc.description.abstract In New Zealand, schools are expected to carry out regular cycles of using and reflecting on data to evaluate their teaching and learning approaches, identify areas for improvement and refine their practices. This practice of school self-evaluation is increasingly prevalent globally, but the New Zealand context is unique in the fact that it is a core mechanism of internal and external accountability within an education system where schools have autonomy. Despite the New Zealand education system’s reliance on school self-evaluation, there has been little recent New Zealand empirical research on these self-review processes. The small amount of literature shows that despite the expectation to engage in self-evaluation, many schools find these processes difficult. This thesis explores the practice of self-evaluation and data use in New Zealand secondary schools and the perspectives of the teachers and school leaders engaged in these activities. This study also investigates how these practices shape organisational change, changes in practice, and changes to teachers’ work. A realist approach to research is used to better understand the ways that lived experience interacts with processes of change, within particular contexts. The articles that comprise this thesis show that the outcomes for teachers and schools are not uniform and that they are shaped by the organisational contexts in which they work and the wider social and political context, particularly the accountability context. The schools in this study use data practices to improve their teaching and improve outcomes for students, however, external accountability pressures can negatively affect their data use processes and school self-evaluation. Navigating the new expectations and the competing influences in the wider context can cause tensions for teachers. This thesis helps us to better understand that the process of data use is more complex, contextual, and less rational than current theoretical understandings might suggest.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Navigating autonomy, agency, and accountability: A study of school self-evaluation in New Zealand secondary schools
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Education
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.date.updated 2022-01-31T21:16:57Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en


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