The representation of New Zealand’s ethnically diverse communities in a Mixed Member Proportional electoral system

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dc.contributor.advisor Curtin, Jennifer
dc.contributor.author Kisby, Ethan
dc.date.accessioned 2022-02-28T02:15:35Z
dc.date.available 2022-02-28T02:15:35Z
dc.date.issued 2021 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/58331
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract This thesis seeks to answer the question, to what extent does the New Zealand electoral system ensure the representation of New Zealand’s ethnically diverse communities? Empirical research is conducted to explore the impact that the introduction of the Mixed Member Proportional electoral system has had on the representation of New Zealand’s ethnically diverse communities. Literature on representation, ethnic diversity and electoral systems were analysed in order to construct a framework. This framework was then used to measure the extent to which New Zealand’s electoral system ensures the representation of its ethnically diverse communities. Hanna Pitkin’s (1967) framework of descriptive and substantive representation provides the foundational understanding of representation for this research. These two understandings of political representation are used to complete a quantitative analysis of ethnic representation in New Zealand. Descriptive representation is measured by comparing levels of MPs elected who identify as belonging to New Zealand’s ethnic communities. For this, a longitudinal study in which levels are compared between New Zealand’s previous pluralist electoral system and its current mixed proportional system is completed. Substantive representation is measured by an analysis New Zealand’s 52nd Parliament’s Hansard records. Parliamentary interventions that related specifically to New Zealand’s ethnic communities are used as an indicator of substantive representation. This analysis found that the majority of interventions are made by members elected via the proportional party list. This analysis also indicates a clear correlation between descriptive and substantive representation. The majority of these interventions were either made by a member who identifies as belonging to the specific group the intervention highlighted, or, belonging to one of New Zealand’s ethnic communities. These findings indicate that New Zealand’s electoral system has increased the descriptive and substantive representation of its ethnically diverse communities. It also finds that descriptive representatives from ethnic communities are more likely to provide substantive representation to those communities, indicating a correlation between descriptive and substantive representation.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/
dc.title The representation of New Zealand’s ethnically diverse communities in a Mixed Member Proportional electoral system
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Politics and International Relations
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.date.updated 2022-02-15T09:47:41Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: the author en


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