Prenatal determinants of depressive symptoms in childhood: Evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand.

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dc.contributor.author Theunissen, Gisela
dc.contributor.author D'Souza, Stephanie
dc.contributor.author Peterson, Elizabeth R
dc.contributor.author Walker, Caroline
dc.contributor.author Morton, Susan Smb
dc.contributor.author Waldie, Karen E
dc.coverage.spatial Netherlands
dc.date.accessioned 2022-03-03T02:14:26Z
dc.date.available 2022-03-03T02:14:26Z
dc.date.issued 2022-1-22
dc.identifier.issn 0165-0327
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/58400
dc.description.abstract <h4>Background</h4>Young people who experience depression are at an increased risk of adverse psychosocial and developmental outcomes that can persist over the lifecourse. Identifying maternal prenatal risk factors that may contribute to childhood depressive symptoms can be useful when considering mental health intervention.<h4>Methods</h4>The current study included 3,925 children from the Growing Up in New Zealand (GUiNZ) study who had complete data for self-reported depressive symptoms and mothers' antenatal information. Depressive symptoms were measured at age 8 using the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children (CESD-10) short form questionnaire. Hierarchical linear regression was used to determine the relationship between prenatal factors and depressive symptoms at age 8.<h4>Results</h4>When controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, our hierarchical linear regression revealed that the most significant maternal prenatal predictors of high depressive symptoms at age 8 were maternal perceived stress, smoking during pregnancy, body mass index (BMI) in the overweight/obese range, and paracetamol intake.<h4>Limitations</h4>One limitation with the current study was a reduction in the sample due to attrition. This may have affected our statistical power, reflected in our modest effect sizes. The sample remained both socioeconomically and ethnically diverse, however our results should be interpreted with respect to the sample and not the whole New Zealand population.<h4>Conclusions</h4>A combination of maternal mental health and lifestyle factors contribute to depressive symptoms for children, possibly through foetal programming. Our results emphasise the importance of mental and physical health support for expectant mothers.
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Elsevier BV
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of affective disorders
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject Antenatal
dc.subject Childhood depression
dc.subject Development
dc.subject Intrauterine
dc.subject Longitudinal
dc.subject Mental health
dc.subject Pregnancy
dc.subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
dc.subject 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.title Prenatal determinants of depressive symptoms in childhood: Evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.jad.2022.01.076
pubs.begin-page 41
pubs.volume 302
dc.date.updated 2022-02-07T20:05:56Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35074461
pubs.end-page 49
pubs.publication-status Published
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Journal Article
pubs.elements-id 881569
dc.identifier.eissn 1573-2517
dc.identifier.pii S0165-0327(22)00087-8


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