Performance of Gender Identities on Facebook by Emerging Adults Living in Aotearoa New Zealand

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dc.contributor.advisor Goode, Luke
dc.contributor.advisor Meehan, Claire
dc.contributor.author Ezel Sertkaya, Canan
dc.date.accessioned 2022-03-14T00:24:17Z
dc.date.available 2022-03-14T00:24:17Z
dc.date.issued 2022 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/58558
dc.description.abstract The ever-growing reliance on social media calls for an examination of identity construction and performance processes online. This thesis investigates how emerging adults (aged 18-25) living in Aotearoa New Zealand express and explore their gender identities on Facebook. Using two-phase methodology, the research investigates four principal issues that are associated with gender-related differences online: usage frequency and motives; language use; visual self-presentation; and perceived privacy and self-disclosure. Phase I comprises 10 focus groups conducted with 39 participants, prioritizing emerging adults’ own narratives. In Phase II, a multimodal critical discourse analytic (MCDA) approach is employed to explore 160 public Facebook profiles belonging to emerging adult users living in New Zealand. Both phases use qualitative methods with an exploratory focus. Findings indicate that normative gender performativity is common, but some research subjects also displayed more non-stereotypical self-presentations. There were some gender-related differences, although these were often not as stark as predicted by some earlier studies. Stereotypical self-portrayals were most apparent in photos, as both research phases showed that many users had a likelihood to replicate traditional gender roles in images. The discussion also includes the experiences of gender and sexuality diverse users, and the findings suggest an empowering potential in their uses of Facebook, such as facilitating coming out, finding support, or socializing. The thesis contributes to the body of scholarship in several ways. Most importantly, it constitutes the first study to focus on gender performativity on social media in the Aotearoa context. It also takes into account the experiences of gender and sexuality diverse users in the discussion around performance of gender identities online. Another strength of the thesis is the use of triangulation, which involves prioritizing emerging adults’ own voices and giving them agency in telling their own stories. Triangulation also contributes to the credibility, reliability, and comprehensiveness of this project.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/
dc.title Performance of Gender Identities on Facebook by Emerging Adults Living in Aotearoa New Zealand
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Film
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.date.updated 2022-03-03T02:14:41Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en


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