An agent-based model of the female rivalry hypothesis for concealed ovulation in humans.

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dc.contributor.author Krems, Jaimie Arona
dc.contributor.author Claessens, Scott
dc.contributor.author Fales, Melissa R
dc.contributor.author Campenni, Marco
dc.contributor.author Haselton, Martie G
dc.contributor.author Aktipis, Athena
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2022-04-14T04:14:02Z
dc.date.available 2022-04-14T04:14:02Z
dc.date.issued 2021-6
dc.identifier.issn 2397-3374
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/58728
dc.description.abstract After half a century of debate and few empirical tests, there remains no consensus concerning why ovulation in human females is considered concealed. The predominant male investment hypothesis states that females were better able to obtain material investment from male partners across those females' ovulatory cycles by concealing ovulation. We build on recent work on female competition to propose and investigate an alternative-the female rivalry hypothesis-that concealed ovulation benefited females by allowing them to avoid aggression from other females. Using an agent-based model of mating behaviour and paternal investment in a human ancestral environment, we did not find strong support for the male investment hypothesis, but found support for the female rivalry hypothesis. Our results suggest that concealed ovulation may have benefitted females in navigating their intrasexual social relationships. More generally, this work implies that explicitly considering female-female interactions may inspire additional insights into female behaviour and physiology.
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofseries Nature human behaviour
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Aggression
dc.subject Sexual Behavior
dc.subject Competitive Behavior
dc.subject Ovulation
dc.subject Computer Simulation
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Aggression
dc.subject Competitive Behavior
dc.subject Computer Simulation
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Ovulation
dc.subject Sexual Behavior
dc.subject Social Sciences
dc.subject Science & Technology
dc.subject Life Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject Psychology, Biological
dc.subject Multidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subject Neurosciences
dc.subject Psychology, Experimental
dc.subject Psychology
dc.subject Science & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subject Neurosciences & Neurology
dc.subject SEXUAL STRATEGIES THEORY
dc.subject WOMENS MATE PREFERENCES
dc.subject MENSTRUAL-CYCLE
dc.subject INDIRECT AGGRESSION
dc.subject EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE
dc.subject INTRASEXUAL COMPETITION
dc.subject TESTOSTERONE RESPONSES
dc.subject RELATIONAL AGGRESSION
dc.subject PATERNAL INVESTMENT
dc.subject ANTHROPOID PRIMATES
dc.title An agent-based model of the female rivalry hypothesis for concealed ovulation in humans.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/s41562-020-01038-9
pubs.issue 6
pubs.begin-page 726
pubs.volume 5
dc.date.updated 2022-03-09T20:20:50Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33495572
pubs.end-page 735
pubs.publication-status Published
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Journal Article
pubs.elements-id 837787
dc.identifier.eissn 2397-3374
dc.identifier.pii 10.1038/s41562-020-01038-9
pubs.online-publication-date 2021-1-25


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