How are ambulance personnel prepared and supported to withhold or terminate resuscitation and manage patient death in the field? A scoping review

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dc.contributor.author Anderson, Natalie
dc.contributor.author Slark, Julia
dc.contributor.author Gott, Merryn
dc.date.accessioned 2022-04-27T03:20:36Z
dc.date.available 2022-04-27T03:20:36Z
dc.date.issued 2019-7-11
dc.identifier.issn 1447-4999
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/58801
dc.description.abstract <jats:p>IntroductionResearch shows that ambulance personnel can find it challenging to withhold or terminate resuscitation and manage patient death in the field. This scoping review provides a synthesis of published research that has addressed three main questions. Each relates to ambulance personnel enacting decisions to withhold or terminate resuscitation and manage patient death: How are they prepare; what supports and coping strategies are utilised; and what preparation and support needs have been identified?MethodsUsing Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage scoping review framework this review identifies what is known and what further research is needed in this area.ResultsSixteen methodologically heterogenous papers were located. Half of the studies were conducted in the United States, with the remainder in Canada, Singapore, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Ambulance personnel receive little formal training and feel unprepared to manage situations where resuscitation is unsuccessful or unwarranted, particularly communicating with family, breaking bad news and managing death scenes. These aspects of termination of resuscitation are so challenging that distancing and avoidance are sometimes used as coping strategies, even when medical futility has been established. In addition to formal counselling for personal loss and stressors, ambulance personnel value downtime and informal peer debriefing, following difficult resuscitation decisions and patient deaths.ConclusionAmbulance personnel feel inadequately prepared to withhold or terminate resuscitation and manage patient death in the field. They want more opportunities to learn about death notification, communication with bereaved families and safe, sensitive management of death scenes. More research is needed to determine how best to prepare and support ambulance personnel for the challenges of resuscitation decision-making and patient death.</jats:p>
dc.publisher Australasian College of Paramedicine
dc.relation.ispartofseries Australasian Journal of Paramedicine
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
dc.title How are ambulance personnel prepared and supported to withhold or terminate resuscitation and manage patient death in the field? A scoping review
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.33151/ajp.16.697
pubs.volume 16
dc.date.updated 2022-03-14T01:54:46Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.publication-status Published online
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Review
pubs.subtype Journal
pubs.elements-id 780689
dc.identifier.eissn 2202-7270
pubs.online-publication-date 2019-7-11


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