Identity Politics And The Meaning Of "Homeland" Among Korean Chinese Migrants In South Korea

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dc.contributor.author Song, C
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-16T00:10:23Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-16T00:10:23Z
dc.date.issued 2014-11-28
dc.identifier.citation (2014). Urban anthropology and studies of cultural systems and world economic development, 43(4), 441-479.
dc.identifier.issn 0894-6019
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/59912
dc.description.abstract This article examines the construction of the no tion of "homeland" among ethnic Koreans in China. Before the establishment of the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1949, "homeland" meant Korea for Korean Chinese. During the Cul tural Revolution, however, they accepted the PRC as their "father land." After the Cultural Revolution, they could re-emphasize their "Korean" identity. Until the mid-1980s, ethnic Koreans in China were culturally and politically closer to North Korea. They were reconnected to South Korea in the 1980s, and many began to migrate there, mainly for employment opportunities. When the South Korean government restricted their entry visas, Korean Chinese claimed their right to "return to the homeland." They rationalized this claim by recalling their ancestors' anti-Japanese struggles in China. In their newly connected ethnic homeland, however, Korean Chinese experienced discrimination and alien ation as low-paid migrant workers. As a result, they developed nostalgia towards China, their natal homeland. At the same time, Korean Chinese migrants culturally distinguish themselves from their co-ethnic South Koreans. This is exemplified in "Homeland Dog Meat Restaurant" fèl It ) with which they claimed dish is different from (and superior to) the same dish Korea. The Korean Chinese case illustrates the competing of "homeland" among ethnic return migrants which even more complex in the context of identity politics.
dc.publisher Institute for the Study of Man, Inc.
dc.relation.ispartofseries Urban anthropology and studies of cultural systems and world economic development
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.title Identity Politics And The Meaning Of "Homeland" Among Korean Chinese Migrants In South Korea
dc.type Journal Article
pubs.issue 4
pubs.begin-page 441
pubs.volume 43
dc.date.updated 2022-05-23T06:25:00Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
pubs.author-url https://www.jstor.org/stable/24643202
pubs.end-page 479
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article
pubs.elements-id 791462
pubs.org-id Arts
pubs.org-id Cultures, Languages & Linguist
pubs.org-id Asian Studies
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2022-05-23
pubs.online-publication-date 2014-11-28


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