How does brief guided mindfulness meditation enhance empathic concern in novice meditators?: A pilot test of the suggestion hypothesis vs. the mindfulness hypothesis.

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dc.contributor.author Miyahara, Motohide
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Rebekah
dc.contributor.author Pocock, Tessa
dc.contributor.author Kano, Tomoko
dc.contributor.author Fukuhara, Hiroyuki
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-21T00:18:47Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-21T00:18:47Z
dc.date.issued 2020-07-11
dc.identifier.citation (2020). Current Psychology: developmental - learning - personality - social, 1-12.
dc.identifier.issn 1046-1310
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/60031
dc.description.abstract Despite the widespread popularity of mindfulness meditation for its various benefits, the mechanism underlying the meditation process has rarely been explored. Here, we present two preliminary studies designed to test alternative hypotheses: whether the effect of brief guided mindfulness meditation on empathic concern arises from verbal suggestion (suggestion hypothesis) or as a byproduct of an induced mindfulness state (mindfulness hypothesis). Study 1 was a pilot randomized control trial of sitting (breath-and-body) meditation vs. compassion meditation that provided preliminary support for the mindfulness hypothesis. Study 2 was set up to rule out the possibility that the meditation effects observed in Study 1 were the effects of repeated measures. An inactive control group of participants underwent the repeated measures of empathic concern with no meditation in between. The pre-post comparison demonstrated no significant changes in the measures. Thus, the results of two studies supported the mindfulness hypothesis. Limitations of the present study and future research directions are discussed.
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.ispartofseries Current psychology (New Brunswick, N.J.)
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject Empathy
dc.subject Meditation
dc.subject Mindfulness
dc.subject Prosocial behavior
dc.subject Suggestion
dc.subject Complementary and Integrative Health
dc.subject Clinical Trials and Supportive Activities
dc.subject Clinical Research
dc.subject Mind and Body
dc.subject Social Sciences
dc.subject Psychology, Multidisciplinary
dc.subject Psychology
dc.subject STRESS REDUCTION
dc.subject SCALE
dc.subject VALIDATION
dc.subject ADULTS
dc.subject MODEL
dc.subject 1701 Psychology
dc.subject 1702 Cognitive Sciences
dc.title How does brief guided mindfulness meditation enhance empathic concern in novice meditators?: A pilot test of the suggestion hypothesis vs. the mindfulness hypothesis.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s12144-020-00881-3
pubs.begin-page 1
dc.date.updated 2022-05-25T01:29:39Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.identifier.pmid 32837131 (pubmed)
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32837131
pubs.end-page 12
pubs.publication-status Published
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype research-article
pubs.subtype Journal Article
pubs.elements-id 810498
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences
pubs.org-id Nursing
dc.identifier.eissn 1936-4733
dc.identifier.pii 881
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2022-05-25
pubs.online-publication-date 2020-07-11


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