Gender self-confidence, scholastic stress, life satisfaction, and perceived academic achievement for adolescent New Zealanders.

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dc.contributor.author Watson, Penelope W St J
dc.contributor.author Sotardi, Valerie A
dc.contributor.author Park, Joohyun Justine
dc.contributor.author Roy, Deepika
dc.coverage.spatial England
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-23T04:46:22Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-23T04:46:22Z
dc.date.issued 2021-04
dc.identifier.citation (2021). Journal of Adolescence, 88(1), 120-133.
dc.identifier.issn 0140-1971
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/60128
dc.description.abstract <h4>Introduction</h4>Confidence in one's gender self-concept has been positively associated with subjective well-being. Further, negative consequences for school life have occurred for adolescents with marginalised gender identities. As a central process variable of subjective well-being, life satisfaction has been positively associated with educational outcomes and inversely associated with stress. Stress, life satisfaction, and academic achievement have been examined in terms of gender, but less is known about their relationship with gender self-concept. Importantly, gender self-concept has been rendered especially vulnerable in adolescence-a time when social self-concept and life satisfaction are reportedly lower than in childhood.<h4>Method</h4>The current study was conducted with adolescents (N = 1601) from seven secondary schools comprising a range of socioeconomic backgrounds and ethnicities, in two major New Zealand metropolitan centres. Data were collected via self-report survey. After checking the validity of each measurement model by using confirmatory factor analysis, structural equation modelling was performed to explore associations between aspects of gender self-concept, stress, life satisfaction (LS), and perceived academic achievement (PAA).<h4>Results</h4>Gender self-definition (GSD; one's self-definition of one's own gender identity) was associated positively with stress, and negatively with perceived academic achievement. Gender self-acceptance (GSA; contentment with one's self-defined gender identity) was negatively associated with stress, and positively associated with LS. Both gender self-acceptance and LS were associated positively with PAA. Two stressors mediated the relationship between LS and both GSD and GSA.<h4>Conclusion</h4>Implications are suggested for fostering gender-identity safe school environments for adolescents to ensure positive wellbeing and scholastic outcomes.
dc.format.medium Print-Electronic
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Wiley
dc.relation.ispartofseries Journal of adolescence
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Stress, Psychological
dc.subject Personal Satisfaction
dc.subject Gender Identity
dc.subject Adolescent
dc.subject Educational Status
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Academic Success
dc.subject Adolescence
dc.subject Gender self-confidence
dc.subject Life satisfaction
dc.subject Perceived academic achievement
dc.subject Stress
dc.subject Basic Behavioral and Social Science
dc.subject Behavioral and Social Science
dc.subject Pediatric
dc.subject Social Sciences
dc.subject Psychology, Developmental
dc.subject Psychology
dc.subject SCHOOL-STUDENTS STRESS
dc.subject CHINESE ADOLESCENTS
dc.subject MENTAL-HEALTH
dc.subject FIT INDEXES
dc.subject IDENTITY
dc.subject VICTIMIZATION
dc.subject TRANSGENDER
dc.subject DIVERSITY
dc.subject MEDIATION
dc.subject FRAMEWORK
dc.subject 1701 Psychology
dc.title Gender self-confidence, scholastic stress, life satisfaction, and perceived academic achievement for adolescent New Zealanders.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.adolescence.2021.02.009
pubs.issue 1
pubs.begin-page 120
pubs.volume 88
dc.date.updated 2022-05-06T20:10:47Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en
dc.identifier.pmid 33756217 (pubmed)
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33756217
pubs.end-page 133
pubs.publication-status Published
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RetrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
pubs.subtype Journal Article
pubs.elements-id 846815
pubs.org-id Education and Social Work
pubs.org-id Learning Development and Professional Practice
dc.identifier.eissn 1095-9254
dc.identifier.pii S0140-1971(21)00035-X
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2022-05-07
pubs.online-publication-date 2021-03-21


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