First language lexical attrition in Chinese teachers of English in China: A psycholinguistic study

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Vanek, Norbert
dc.contributor.author Ma, Yueqingzhou
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-28T02:49:58Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-28T02:49:58Z
dc.date.issued 2022 en
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/60179
dc.description Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract Language attrition, defined here as a non-pathological loss of a language in a bilingual individual due to ceased or reduced language use, often results from linguistic, socio-cultural, and psychological factors. First language (L1) attrition, its sub-field, has attracted much attention. Most studies on L1 attrition have focused on immigrants in their second language environment, yet scant research exists on L1 attrition in the L1 setting. Lexicon is often the first and most vulnerable linguistic component to be disappearing, thus studies on L1 lexical attrition abound. For China-based studies, L1 attrition mainly focuses on minority languages, not Mandarin. To fill this research gap, this project used two lexical tasks to test L1 attrition, a time-sensitive word decision task and a video retelling. 25 Chinese teachers of English (experimental group) and 25 non-English Chinese teachers (control group) were recruited at a secondary school in China. The aim was to provide an exploratory basis of the L2 influence on L1 lexical attrition in the L1 environment, both on the level of lexical comprehension and production. Linear mixed-effects models in R were used to analyze (a) response accuracy and reaction times in comprehension, and (b) lexical diversity, density, sophistication, accuracy, and variation in production. The results showed Chinese teachers' L1 lexical attrition in the form of longer response time to correctly decide high-frequency Chinese words compared to non-English Chinese teachers, Chinese teachers tended to use significantly fewer sophisticated words and more codeswitching in their retellings. Also, Chinese teachers were faster and more accurate in making correct decisions about Chinese borrowings from English, suggesting L2-driven influence on their mental lexicon. Considering background information, the data showed that increased L2 exposure and frequency of use can predict the degree of L1 lexical attrition.
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof Masters Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Full Text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nz/
dc.title First language lexical attrition in Chinese teachers of English in China: A psycholinguistic study
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Applied Linguistics
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Masters en
dc.date.updated 2022-05-29T08:18:21Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: the author en


Files in this item

Find Full text

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Share

Search ResearchSpace


Browse

Statistics