Becoming whānau: Māori and Pākehā working together on the Indigenous-led campaign, #ProtectIhumātao

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dc.contributor.author Hancock, Frances
dc.contributor.author Newton, Pania
dc.date.accessioned 2022-07-26T02:16:55Z
dc.date.available 2022-07-26T02:16:55Z
dc.date.issued 2022-02-02
dc.identifier.citation (2022). Ethnicities, 146879682110626-.
dc.identifier.issn 1468-7968
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/2292/60534
dc.description.abstract <jats:p> This paper explores how the Indigenous-led, community-supported campaign # ProtectIhumātao became a site for decolonisation work that nourished productive bicultural relations. For six years, we worked together, alongside others, to stop a transnational corporation building houses on culturally significant, but contested, whenua (land) at Ihumātao, Auckland. Pania draws strength from her Indigenous Māori whakapapa (ancestral relations), and Frances from being a New Zealander of Irish descent. Committing ourselves to the campaign kaupapa (values, principles and plans), we embraced different roles: Pania as a kaitiaki or land protector and Frances as a hoa tū tata or close friend, standing by, ready to assist. Along the way, we became our own whānau (extended family); a kaupapa-based whānau (people mobilised for a shared purpose). Here, we share knowledge from our campaign experiences to explore what becoming whānau means to us in relation to Ihumātao. Thinking and writing at the interface of Māori and Pākehā ways of knowing, we interact with ideas from Māori philosophy and Indigenous–Settler relations. Through telling our stories, we illuminate relational qualities that made our different roles and evolving relationship possible, and glean insights to inform ongoing Indigenous-led, decolonising practices at Ihumātao, and elsewhere. </jats:p>
dc.language en
dc.publisher SAGE Publications
dc.relation.ispartofseries Ethnicities
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm
dc.rights.uri https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/posting-to-an-institutional-repository-green-open-access
dc.subject Social Sciences
dc.subject Ethnic Studies
dc.subject whanau
dc.subject #ProtectIhumatao
dc.subject Maori political movements
dc.subject Maori-Pakeha relations
dc.subject Indigenous-Settler relations
dc.subject 16 Studies in Human Society
dc.subject 20 Language, Communication and Culture
dc.title Becoming whānau: Māori and Pākehā working together on the Indigenous-led campaign, #ProtectIhumātao
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi 10.1177/14687968211062655
pubs.begin-page 146879682110626
dc.date.updated 2022-06-29T02:03:41Z
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The authors en
pubs.author-url http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000753066800001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=6e41486220adb198d0efde5a3b153e7d
pubs.publication-status Published online
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess en
pubs.subtype Article
pubs.subtype Early Access
pubs.subtype Journal
pubs.elements-id 907778
pubs.org-id Education and Social Work
pubs.org-id Te Puna Wananga
dc.identifier.eissn 1741-2706
pubs.number ARTN 14687968211062655
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2022-06-29
pubs.online-publication-date 2022-02-02


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