Physiology of neuronal subtypes in the respiratory-vocal integration nucleus retroamigualis of the male zebra finch

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dc.contributor.author Kubke, Maria en
dc.contributor.author Yazaki-Sugiyama, Y en
dc.contributor.author Mooney, R en
dc.contributor.author Wild, John en
dc.date.accessioned 2011-08-11T04:05:50Z en
dc.date.issued 2005-10 en
dc.identifier.citation J NEUROPHYSIOL 94(4):2379-2390 Oct 2005 en
dc.identifier.issn 0022-3077 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/7311 en
dc.description.abstract Learned vocalizations, such as bird song, require intricate coordination of vocal and respiratory muscles. Although the neural basis for this coordination remains poorly understood, it likely includes direct synaptic interactions between respiratory premotor neurons and vocal motor neurons. In birds, as in mammals, the medullary nucleus retroambigualis ( RAm) receives synaptic input from higher level respiratory and vocal control centers and projects to a variety of targets. In birds, these include vocal motor neurons in the tracheosyringeal part of the hypoglossal motor nucleus ( XIIts), other respiratory premotor neurons, and expiratory motor neurons in the spinal cord. Although various cell types in RAm are distinct in their anatomical projections, their electrophysiological properties remain unknown. Furthermore, although prior studies have shown that RAm provides both excitatory and inhibitory input onto XIIts motor neurons, the identity of the cells in RAm providing either of these inputs remains to be established. To characterize the different RAm neuron types electrophysiologically, we used intracellular recordings in a zebra finch brain stem slice preparation. Based on numerous differences in intrinsic electrophysiological properties and a principal components analysis, we identified two distinct RAm neuron types ( types I and II). Antidromic stimulation methods and intracellular staining revealed that type II neurons, but not type I neurons, provide bilateral synaptic input to XIIts. Paired intracellular recordings in RAm and XIIts further indicated that type II neurons with a hyperpolarization- dependent bursting phenotype are a potential source of inhibitory input to XIIts motor neurons. These results indicate that electrically distinct cell types exist in RAm, affording physiological heterogeneity that may play an important role in respiratory - vocal signaling. en
dc.language EN en
dc.publisher AMER PHYSIOLOGICAL SOC en
dc.relation.ispartofseries J NEUROPHYSIOL en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Details obtained from http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0022-3077// en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.subject MOTONEURONAL CELL GROUPS en
dc.subject FINAL COMMON PATHWAY en
dc.subject INSPIRATORY PREMOTOR NEURONS en
dc.subject FEMALE GOLDEN-HAMSTER en
dc.subject PIGEON COLUMBA-LIVIA en
dc.subject BRAIN-STEM en
dc.subject MONOSYNAPTIC PROJECTIONS en
dc.subject DESCENDING PROJECTIONS en
dc.subject MEMBRANE-PROPERTIES en
dc.subject RHYTHM GENERATION en
dc.title Physiology of neuronal subtypes in the respiratory-vocal integration nucleus retroamigualis of the male zebra finch en
dc.type Journal Article en
dc.identifier.doi 10.1152/jn.00257.2005 en
pubs.issue 4 en
pubs.begin-page 2379 en
pubs.volume 94 en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: 2005 The American Physiological Society en
dc.identifier.pmid 15928060 en
pubs.end-page 2390 en
pubs.publication-status Published en
dc.rights.accessrights http://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/RestrictedAccess en
pubs.subtype Article en
pubs.elements-id 38741 en
pubs.org-id Medical and Health Sciences en
pubs.org-id Medical Sciences en
pubs.org-id Anatomy and Medical Imaging en
pubs.record-created-at-source-date 2010-09-01 en
pubs.dimensions-id 15928060 en


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