Left-Right and Foveal-Parafoveal Differences in Bistable Motion Perception

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dc.contributor.advisor Corballis, Michael C. en
dc.contributor.author Rutherford, Barbara Joyce en
dc.date.accessioned 2007-07-11T10:13:38Z en
dc.date.available 2007-07-11T10:13:38Z en
dc.date.issued 1996 en
dc.identifier THESIS 97-020 en
dc.identifier.citation Thesis (PhD--Psychology)--University of Auckland, 1996 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2292/883 en
dc.description Full text is available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland only. en
dc.description.abstract The Ternus display invokes a bistable motion percept, in which either the elements are seen to move as a group, or only the end elements move. Chapter I of this thesis proposes an alternative to Braddick's (1974,1980) two-process distinction for bistable motion perception. A spatial-frequency model is advanced that proposes that higher spatial frequencies are dominant in stationarity perception, while lower spatial frequencies are dominant in the perception of apparent motion. The model ties the processing of spatial frequencies to the duration of visual persistence. Visual persistence, in turn, is thought to influence the perception of temporal frequencies. Chapter 2 reviews evidence for asymmetry in processing spatial and temporal frequencies- A spatio-temporal model is proposed that allows the predictions of asymmetry of the temporal-frequency hypothesis (Nicholls & Atkinson, 1993) to be compared with those of the spatial-frequency hypothesis (Sergent, 1982, 1983, 1987). Chapter 3 presents results from experiments that test for foveal-parafoveal and left-right differences in bistable motion perception. Contrary to results reported by Casco and Spinelli (1988), these experiments show that the perception of end movement is more likely with foveal than parafoveal presentation, and more likely with left-visual-field than with right-visual-field presentation. The foveal-parafoveal difference provides support for the spatial-frequency model for bistable motion perception. The left-right difference, according to the spatio-temporal model proposed in Chapter 2, suggests that the left hemisphere is advantaged for processing lower spatial frequencies and higher temporal frequencies, while the right hemisphere is advantaged for processing higher spatial frequencies and lower temporal frequencies. This interpretation converges with the predictions of the temporal-frequency hypothesis (Nicholls & Atkinson, 1993) but is contrary to those of the spatial-frequency hypothesis (Sergent, 1982, 1983, 1987) en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher ResearchSpace@Auckland en
dc.relation.ispartof PhD Thesis - University of Auckland en
dc.relation.isreferencedby UoA9966319414002091 en
dc.rights Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated en
dc.rights Restricted Item. Available to authenticated members of The University of Auckland. en
dc.rights.uri https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/docs/uoa-docs/rights.htm en
dc.title Left-Right and Foveal-Parafoveal Differences in Bistable Motion Perception en
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology en
thesis.degree.grantor The University of Auckland en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.name PhD en
dc.rights.holder Copyright: The author en


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